Posted in book review, Uncategorized

A Review of Narrative Apologetics by Alastair McGrath

Narrative Apologetics

According to McGrath attempting to convince the world of the truth of Christianity by stating a laundry list of facts or information is to misunderstand its essential nature. Although the Christian faith has a structure of truth that defines it, the Bible was not written in list or bullet form. The insistence of a scholastic interpretation of the Bible and a systematic theology has, according to the book, been handed down from the idea of logos over mythos, perhaps from as early as the Hellenistic tradition and a focus on rational argument over narrative, and further dialed in by the Reformation, forming the backbone of Christian fundamentalism. A departure from this form of interpretation is seen as heresy in some groups. Although the Christian faith has a structure of truth that defines it, the Bible was not written in list or bullet form. The Old and New Testament are couched in story form, and about real-live people from Moses to Jesus. An understanding of the Hebrew belief system yields a rich story tradition along with a structured framework of commands and instructions alongside and complimentary to the Torah itself.

McGrath makes the argument that the Christian metanarrative tells such grand and epic stories that the stories of all other cultures are embedded within them, a ‘deeper account …capable of accommodating valid insights from other narratives’ and it is the Christian’s job to tell them.  This is a welcome departure from the once common practice of handing out a tract, or piece of paper with Biblical truths and hoping someone will read it, often sidestepping the relational and uniquely human aspect of Christianity. He has a compelling argument. I found the book well worth reading.

 

I was given a copy of this book from Baker Books in return for my honest opinion.

Author:

Artistic specialist, wonderer, idea maven, mom of four, and two more. Words and notes are my media of choice.

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